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FTSE 250 tech stock Avast fell 23% last week. What’s the best move now?

first_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Edward Sheldon, CFA | Monday, 3rd February, 2020 | More on: AVST Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. FTSE 250 tech stock Avast fell 23% last week. What’s the best move now? Organic billings growth of 10.2%  Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Enter Your Email Address I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” It’s amazing how quickly investor sentiment can change. The week before last, cybersecurity specialist Avast (LSE: AVST) was one of the best-performing stocks in the FTSE 250 for the year. In the space of just a few weeks, its share price had shot up from around 450p to 550p. And brokers were expecting it to keep rising too, with analysts at Jefferies slapping a price target of 627p on it on 21 January.Last week, however, the FTSE 250 stock came crashing back down to earth. Between Monday and Thursday, it fell from around 550p to just under 400p – a decline of nearly 30%.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…So, why did Avast shares experience such a dramatic shift in sentiment? Let’s take a look at what happened.Data privacy issuesThe reason Avast shares fell sharply is that a report emerged mid-week claiming that the cybersecurity company had been selling highly sensitive browsing history data of its users.According to an investigation by Motherboard and PCMag, Avast was tracking data – including Google searches, website visits, and GPS coordinates – through its free antivirus programmes, and this was being sold (after being de-identified) to the likes of Google, Yelp, and Microsoft, through another subsidiary named Jumpshot.Avast claims that it had user consent to collect data. However, users were apparently not aware that their data was being sold on. Another issue is that the investigation found that it was fairly easy to reveal the identities of those whose data had been sold on.Company responseIn response to the report, Avast came out on Wednesday and said that it was reviewing how trends analytics service Jumpshot aligns with its values as a cybersecurity and privacy company. Then on Thursday, the group advised that it had decided to terminate the provision of data to Jumpshot with immediate effect.CEO Ondrej Vlcek said: “Avast has always been committed to doing the right thing for its users and customers, and this is the overarching principle that has guided our decisions in response to recent developments. While we have always acted with integrity, our respect for people’s privacy concerns must take precedence over everything else.”The group reinforced its view that it had always acted in full accordance with privacy regulations and had worked to implement best practices.It said that it expects to incur a one-time exceptional cash cost of between $15m to $25m in the current financial year to cover closure costs, an asset write-down and employee restructuring.Trading updateAvast also took the opportunity to provide a brief trading update. For the year ending 31 December 2019, it expects to report:center_img Looking ahead, it said that it expects to deliver mid-single-digit organic revenue growth in FY2020. What now?Avast has certainly made the right move in terminating the provision of data to Jumpshot, in my view, as data privacy is a big issue these days. Looking at the company’s share price, it seems the market agrees with me, as the stock has rebounded over 10% since Friday.Given that the group is adamant that it always acted in full accordance with privacy regulations, I think the recent pullback may have created a buying opportunity. The forward-looking P/E ratio has fallen to about 17.7, which is an attractive valuation in my opinion given the company’s growth potential.  Organic revenue growth of 9.1%  I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Image source: Getty Images. Edward Sheldon owns shares in Alphabet and Microsoft. Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. Teresa Kersten, an employee of LinkedIn, a Microsoft subsidiary, is a member of The Motley Fool’s board of directors. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended Alphabet (C shares) and Microsoft and recommends the following options: long January 2021 $85 calls on Microsoft and short January 2021 $115 calls on Microsoft. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Adjusted EBITDA growth of 7.9% See all posts by Edward Sheldon, CFAlast_img read more

2 high-risk FTSE 100 stocks I won’t touch with a bargepole

first_img I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Image source: Getty Images. See all posts by Royston Wild Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. For the likes of Intu Properties (LSE: INTU) things are going from bad to worse. The FTSE 100 share has been under the cosh for the past couple of years, true. But more recent news flow suggests it could be on the verge of extinction.The Brexit uncertainty that has battered consumer confidence is proving quite tame compared with the upheaval that Covid-19-related lockdowns have caused. The prospect of a deep recession starting from the second quarter suggests that things will remain difficult for retailers. And by extension for this particular Footsie firm.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Fresh plans from Business Secretary Alok Sharma mean that retail property owners Intu could find it even more difficult to collect rents from its embattled tenants.More bad newsThe plans from Sharma will prohibit retail landlords from using “aggressive” tactics to collect rents. They will temporarily void statutory demands and winding up petitions issued to commercial tenants, for one. They will also prohibit landlords from using the Commercial Rent Arrears Recovery mechanism unless 90 days of rent is owed.Sharma commented that “it is vital that we ensure businesses are kept afloat so that they can continue to provide the jobs our economy needs beyond the coronavirus pandemic.” This will come as little consolation to Intu Properties, however, when the company is already struggling underneath a suffocating mountain of debt and a catastrophe in rent collections.So forget about its ridiculously low forward price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of 1.1 times, I say. This FTSE 100 stock carries too much risk to warrant interest from sensible investors.How about this FTSE 100 stock’s 6.6% yield?Would investors be better off ploughing their cash into Rio Tinto (LSE: RIO)? Despite the coronavirus outbreak, iron ore values have remained remarkably robust. Indeed they have recently surged to 2020 highs on news that another mega miner, Vale, had slashed its production guidance for 2020. It’s a development that could remove up to 25m tonnes of iron ore from the market.I fear that this price momentum could struggle to keep going, though. With a painful and prolonged downturn in the global economy lurking, I think demand from steel mills inside China and elsewhere could begin to unravel quickly.Fresh figures from UBS have fanned my fears, too. According to the bank, worldwide crude steel production dropped 6% year on year in March. In China output dropped 2% while steel mills outside the Asian powerhouse toppled 11%. Hopes of a tightening iron ore market could very quickly unravel, then, dragging the commodity price lower and with it Rio’s profits.This is why I don’t care much for the mining giant’s low P/E ratio of below 10 times for 2020. I’m also unmoved by its whopping 6.6% dividend yield. Rio is another FTSE 100 stock I am avoiding at all costs. Enter Your Email Address Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Royston Wild | Friday, 24th April, 2020 | More on: INTU RIO center_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Royston Wild has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. 2 high-risk FTSE 100 stocks I won’t touch with a bargepolelast_img read more

Sullivan’s staff returns to Apopka this month

first_img The Anatomy of Fear If you live north of 441 you are most likely in District 31 and Jennifer Sullivan is your State Representative in Tallahassee.Sullivan is in her second term in the Florida Legislature after decisive wins in 2014, and 2016. She is the Majority Deputy Whip of the Florida Legislature. Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! TAGSRep. Jennifer Sullivan Previous articleOn This Day in History: The Allies land on the beaches of NormandyNext articleMissing Child Alert: 16-year-old Apopka girl missing Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herecenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Coming to Apopka City Hall in JuneJennifer SullivanState Representative Jennifer Sullivan’s staff will hold office hours at Apopka City Hall on Tuesday, June 26th, 2018 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. for constituent outreach.  Please call Morgan Hatfield at 352-742-6275 for an appointment.If you need immediate assistance, please visit or contact our Eustis office located at 2755 South Bay Street, Unit D, Eustis 32726, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  You may also contact our office at [email protected] Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate last_img read more

Miracle Residence / BFTA Mimarlik

first_img Turkey “COPY” “COPY” Save this picture!© Gürkan Akay+ 23 Share ArchDaily 2012 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/230171/miracle-residence-bfta-mimarlik Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/230171/miracle-residence-bfta-mimarlik Clipboard Projects CopyHousing•Istanbul, Turkey Miracle Residence / BFTA Mimarlik Year:  Housing Architects: BFTA Mimarlik Area Area of this architecture project Miracle Residence / BFTA MimarlikSave this projectSaveMiracle Residence / BFTA Mimarlik Area:  17000 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Photographs:  Gürkan AkayText description provided by the architects. The project is located at the Istanbul’s asian side near Sabiha Gokcen Int. Airport. Site was some 50m.x300m. in dimensions, along southeast-northwest direction and facing the highway at north. Save this picture!© Gürkan AkayThe recently opened Sabiha Gokcen Airport is the only alternative in the city for the over crowded European side Ataturk Int. Airport. Since the availability of the new airport, new demands for dwelling and retail created denser land use and offers new opportunities for the Kurtkoy district. Save this picture!© Gürkan AkayMiracle Residence seems as a gate for this promising area. It consists two 100m. blocks creating 250m. long hotel and residential block with the social facilities in between. This 25m.x250m. long surface not designed as if its another ordinary building in the area but, taken as a residential block design experiment. Unique fibecement blocks, compact wooden lamine panels, standardized windows creates its own harmony as design elements. Since the block resides south edge of the site, there’s so many potential uses on paysage, like water scapes, sports grounds and pool.Save this picture!plan 01Project gallerySee allShow lessResene Architecture & Design Film FestivalArticlesZaha Hadid Exhibition at the Buchmann GalerieArticlesProject locationAddress:Harmandere Mh., Kurtköy Kavşağı, 34912 Istanbul, TurkeyLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Photographs CopyAbout this officeBFTA MimarlikOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingIstanbulHousingMixed UseHotels and RestaurantsTurkeyPublished on April 29, 2012Cite: “Miracle Residence / BFTA Mimarlik” 29 Apr 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogShowershansgroheShower MixersVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ Abrasion ResistantPartitionsSkyfoldIntegrating Operable Walls in a SpaceLightsVibiaLamps – NorthCultural / PatrimonialIsland Exterior FabricatorsSeptember 11th Memorial Museum Envelope SystemSkylightsVELUX CommercialAtrium Longlight, DZNE GermanyHanging LampsLouis PoulsenLamp – PH ArtichokeTiles / Mosaic / GresiteHisbalitMosaic Tiles – TexturasAcousticMetawellAluminum Panels – Acoustic SailsMineral / Organic PaintsKEIMTiO2-free Mineral Paint – Soldalit®-ArteWall / Ceiling LightsA-LightWall Grazer Concealed LightsDoorsBuster and PunchDoor Hardware – Pull BarMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Nightrider™ partners with Virgin Money Giving again

first_img Howard Lake | 18 November 2011 | News Nightrider™ partners with Virgin Money Giving again AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  28 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Nightrider™ London 2012, the moonlit ride through London for hundreds of charities, has partnered with Virgin Money Giving for the second year.The 1,000 participants who took part in this year’s event raised over £500,000 for over 200 different charities. Organisers Classic Tours say that next year’s event on 9/10 June 2012 will involve 3,000 cyclists and should raise £1 milllion.Any charity can take part and benefit. Charity places are priced at £60 each (with a minimum purchase of 10). Supporters then register at a discounted rate of £39 and pledge to raise a minimum sponsorship target set by the charity, usually £175. The average sponsorship raised per person via Virgin Money Giving on Nightrider™ 2011 was £722 including Gift Aid.Nightriders will set off from either Crystal Palace or Alexandra Palace and follow a 100km moonlit route past over 50 iconic London landmarks. The itinerary will be entirely on roads for ease of access and quality of lighting. Classic Tours provides “full support and back up” through the night.www.nightrider.org.uk Tagged with: Digital Events About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Taxi hailing app benefits charities through cab:miles

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Tagged with: app corporate mobile  42 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 Taxi hailing app benefits charities through cab:miles A national black cab booking and payment app that encourages people to donate their loyalty miles to charity has launched.Cab:app is designed for iOS and Android users, and is available for ordering taxis on the go via iOS, Google play, and the cab:app website. It connects passengers in over 90 locations with black cabs across the UK, and licensed taxis in Ireland.Customers collect cab:miles on each journey they take, which can be redeemed against journeys or donated to charity.Initial charity partners at launch are Action for Children, Barnado’s, Irish Motor Neurone Disease Association, LauraLynn, Penny for London, and Target Ovarian Cancer.Jane Van Aken, cab:app co-founder, said:“Through our cab:miles programme, passengers can choose from the six leading charities we have selected as our initial partners, to benefit from the loyalty rewards they will receive on every journey simply by inputting the relevant charity partner code.  This is a win:win for all concerned as charities earn extra revenues whilst it costs the consumer no more than the fare would ordinarily have.”The app is the second taxi app to launch this year that raises funds for charity. Liverpool-based CabGo launched in July to cover a number of towns and cities in the north west of the country. It benefits charities by taking 50p from the driver’s fare for booking the ride, and donating 10p of that to the customer’s chosen charity. Advertisement Melanie May | 24 December 2015 | News About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Limerick lectures contribute chapters to the Cambridge History of Ireland

first_imgFacebook Linkedin Pictured (L-R) at the launch ceremony Dr Maura Cronin, Dr Clodagh Tait and Dr Liam Chambers all members of MIC’s Department of HistoryMary Immaculate College (MIC) history lecturers are contributors to what is the most comprehensive and authoritative history of Ireland yet attempted.Dr Liam Chambers, Dr Maura Cronin and Dr Clodagh Tait have all contributed chapters to the Cambridge History of Ireland, edited by Thomas Bartlett, and written by a team of more than 100 leading historians from around the world.The book was officially launched by President Michael D Higgins at a ceremony in DublinCastle on Monday night. Vibrant, comprehensive, and accessible, The Cambridge History of Ireland presents the Irish story – or stories – from 600 to the present. Four comprehensive volumes bring together the latest scholarship, setting Irish history within broader Atlantic, European, imperial and global contexts.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up According to Dr Liam Chambers, Head of MIC’s Department of History; “I am delighted to be a part of this landmark publication. My chapter looks at Irish migrants to France, Spain and other parts of continental Europe between 1691 and 1815. This reflects one of the ambitions of the book: to place Irish history in European, Atlantic and global contexts. The chapter is also a reminder of the importance of migration in Irish history, a feature of our past which is very relevant to twenty-first century debates.”Dr Clodagh Tait’s contribution looks at Irish Society 1550-1700 and deals with social status. Dr Tait says of her chapter “I was especially concerned to say something substantive on members of lower sorts who are often neglected in studies of early modern Ireland. I sought as well to show that all sections of society were involved in politics broadly defined, and might robustly defend their rights and privileges by the use of tactics of petitioning and even riot. I hope that in the process I have caught something of the variety and vibrancy of Irelands communities in this period.”Dr Cronin’s contribution examines Popular politics  Dr Cronin says the aim of thechapter was to “set out the ever-changing political outlook among the cosmhuintir, focussing on attitudes to leadership, the fluidity of sectarian and economic animosities, and the impact of place and memory on popular political involvement.”Speaking at the launch President Higgins said “ Today, we celebrate an important addition to the tradition of history-writing in Ireland, one that I have no doubt will be a reference work for many years to come.”History has been taught at MIC since the first classes commenced in 1901 and the Department, which was created in 1974, is the oldest of its kind in the region. The department currently provides undergraduate degree courses to BA (Liberal Arts) and B Ed (Primary Level Teaching) degrees.The Department also offers a taught MA degree in History and, in conjunction with the University of Limerick, a taught MA degree in Local History. The Department also supervises research postgraduate students at MA and PhD levels.Applications are currently being accepted for the postgraduate programmes. Full details atwww.mic.ieMore about education here. Advertisement Previous articleMeeting to discuss setting up a Community First Responder Group to take place in AdareNext articleSex assault on Limerick student under investigation Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Fishermen’s tales find a home in online Limerick archives RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Email Print NewsEducationLimerick lectures contribute chapters to the Cambridge History of IrelandBy Staff Reporter – May 2, 2018 2856 TAGSCambridge History of IrelandDr. Clodagh TaitDr. Liam ChambersDr. Maura Croninhistory lecturersMary Immaculate CollegePresident Michael D Higgins Twitterlast_img read more

Odessa Police Asking for Public’s Help Identifying Forgery Suspect

first_img TAGS  Odessa Police Asking for Public’s Help Identifying Forgery Suspect Pinterest Twitter Facebook Pinterest Previous articlePartnership secures transportation for seniorsNext article041919_Stations_of_the_cross_JF_09 Odessa American Press release via Odessa Police Department. On 3-4-19, Odessa Police responded to 2120 East 42nd Street (Taco Villa) in reference to a counterfeit bill. Investigation revealed that an unknown male subject attempted to pass a counterfeit bill. Anyone with information in reference to the identity of the suspect shown below is encouraged to contact Detective L. Gonzales at 432-335-3345 or Odessa Crime Stoppers at 432-333-TIPS and reference Case #19-10101.center_img WhatsApp Facebook WhatsApp Local NewsLaw Enforcement By Odessa American – February 24, 2021 Twitterlast_img read more

Is the Web a friend to HR?

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Howwill the Internet and the new generation of HR leaders who are pioneering e-HRalter the role of the profession? And will these changes benefit the professionor signal its demise? Personnel Today teamed up with KnowledgePool to debatethe issue. By Phil BoucherOnething is certain about the impact of the Internet on HR – the profession cannotafford to ignore it. Like previous technological revolutions, from the printingpress to the spinning jenny to the telephone, the Internet is changing the worldand there is no turning back. Thereis a sense, though, that HR people have been slower to jump on the bandwagonthan those in other professions. One reason is that nobody is yet sure whetherthe Web is a friend or a foe to HR.Itsbiggest impact so far has been on recruitment with the explosion of online jobsites, but the long-term impact of the Web could be much more profound andarguably even endanger the survival of in-house HR altogether. Amongthe threats to the HR profession presented by e-HR is the prospect that mosttasks could be turned into online transactions between employees and thecompany intranet. HRdepartments will be pared down to a bare minimum, or outsourced altogether. Thefew survivors will find that their traditional skills in people management andspecialist knowledge in areas such as employment law have become obsolete whenline managers can gain access to the same services online. Butfor each threat to HR posed by the Web there is an opportunity. The shift to HRon the intranet will relieve practitioners of much of the administrative“grunge” that still makes up too big a proportion of HR work. Outsourcingpresents opportunities for those pioneers who want to move out of themainstream into HR consultancy work in cutting-edge organisations.Soexactly how will the role of HR change? And what do HR professionals have to doto gear themselves up for the Internet age? Tofind out, Personnel Today teamed up with e-learning specialist KnowledgePool toorganise a roundtable debate on the issue. We invited some of the youngergeneration of web-savvy HR professionals, as well as more seasoned HRpractitioners and experts in the field to debate what impact the Internet willhave on HR and if the effects will be positive or negative. What follows is asummary of the themes that emerged.Howwill the Internet change HR?Thebiggest change brought about by Web technology is the way it has acceleratedthe automation of HR tasks and enabled HR departments to put basic employee transactionsonline. Atone extreme this can lead to the outsourcing of the HR function altogether. Outsourcingclearly appeals to Kevin Green, managing director of HR consultancy Qtab. “Ifit is a solution for the transactional side of HR then why not out- source it?”Green asked the other participants. Theanswer, according to Amira Kohler, director of people management at Metrius, isto identify what added value internal HR specialists can offer, and this istied to their understanding of the business. She pointed out that in themselvesonline HR tools are not solutions. You can do 360-degree appraisal online, forexample, but, “that’s the beginning of the conversation,” Kohler said. “HRpeople then add value.” Intheory, freeing HR professionals from the “grunge” of HR administration shouldfree them to adopt a strategic role, but it may not be so simple in reality.“HR could get fixated on managing the grunge online,” warned Ralph Tribe,vice-president of HR at Getty Images. Devolvingresponsibility for this to the line will not necessarily help, Kohleradded.  “Staff don’t want to do therubbish either,” she argued. The trick, she said, is to work with technologysuppliers to limit administrative grunge. Evidenceso far shows that e-HR does result in cuts to HR staff and to a change in theresponsibility of those who remain. The survivors are likely to take on astrategic and consultancy role in their organisations, as Kohler suggested. Accordingto Victoria Bird, HR manager of Electronic Arts, e-HR requires a heightenedlevel of business understanding. “In the future, I think HR professionals willbe people who could have also gone into marketing,” she said.PaulCulleton, vice-president of HR at Johnson & Johnson, agreed. “You need tothink about the internal marketing, positioning and content of the productwithin the culture of your organisation,” he said. Intranetswill also force HR professionals to review how they present their coreinformation, from HR policy through to employee benefits.“HRpeople tend to think that everyone wants to have all the details they will everneed so we put together huge manuals and expect them to pick out the bits theywant,” said Kohler. “That’s not good enough. We need to think about producinginformation that is swallowable.”Alarge part of HR’s role in future could be designing the service online. “TheHR profession has got to think about designing processes and initiatives withthe delivery channel and end user in mind,” said Kohler. “Weshould recognise that, increasingly, CVs are going to come directly through theWeb and have that in mind at the time of devising the processes rather thantrying to shoe-horn it in later.”Animportant concept to emerge in the debate was “stickiness” – the ability of Webservices to ensure users return to the site. Electronic Arts’ HR website notonly has simple benefits or holiday forms but also e-commerce links. “Myvision would be a website where you can do everything,” Bird explained.  “Yes, there are benefits and yes there’shealth information, but it’s also somewhere that you can do your shopping. Itmight not be a HR function but it’s about pulling people to your site. If youwant to find out about flower arranging – go to the site too as that’slearning. It’s not about learning to do your role and your job necessarily, butit’s a completely different mindset.”Sinceits introduction she has recognised a large increase in web traffic. “From myexperience, people surfing the site will only visit it once in a while if you’vejust got a list of benefits,” she said. “If you have a site which is like your total career and your life thenpeople are going to visit it every day.”RalphTribe agreed that this approach could address the issue of stickiness. “It isthe Web changing the working environment. It becomes less of a vending machineand becomes a working world that you switch on in the morning and dip in andout of during the day,” he said. Whatskills will HR professionals need for e-HR? TheWeb is fundamentally changing the skills set needed by HR professionals, thepanel agreed. “HR professionals will become a hybrid between HR and people whoare web-savvy, web project managers,” said Bird. Thisdoes not explain how that can be achieved or where HR departments are going todevelop the Web skills to make it a reality. Bird contended that handlingon-line recruitment has enabled her to “manage almost any website”.Apartfrom new technology skills, HR professionals will need a heightened commercialawareness, according to Brian McLaren, head of training and online learning forRoyal Bank of Scotland. “The Web calls upon people to be more commerciallyaware, which I think is a big part of the future of HR,” said McClaren. Theseskills will be needed to deal with those supplying technology solutions.McClaren added, “It can be difficult to deal with a technical supplier whoclaims to have the solution to all your problems, particularly if you have totell them that you’re not interested. It’s a big change for people who havegrown used to the personnel officer-type role.”McClarenidentified commercial awareness, partnering of internal and external customersand supplier management as key HR skills of the future.Greenwarned that there were risks for HR. “Are we just recipients of the latest fadfrom the marketplace?” he asked. Culletonargued that HR managers needed to champion the Internet in their organisations.They should “act like a CEO who just happens to have HR responsibility” andbring technological awareness to the boardroom. HR should promote webtechnology “so that it makes sense to the board and can then be introduced tothe whole organisation”, said Culleton.PhilipBurns, vice-president of European HR for Electronic Arts, supported this view.“Technology is providing us with an opportunity. We either take that up andexploit it or we leave all the possibilities of its HR functions behind,” hesaid. Burnssuggested that lack of confidence has caused HR professionals to ignore thefull potential of web technology. “The Internet is a reality. It’s a fantastictool for HR. Let it demonstrate the benefits to the organisation. But not withmassive board level presentations as they are not going to be too interested –they’re going to want to see results. So let’s get some results and not spendtoo much time navel-gazing.”Thepanel agreed that HR has a key role in leading change, not just as changeagents, but as initiators of change. Kohlerhad a view as to what was the best way to develop cutting-edge e-HR skills:“Work in organisations where there is a passionate belief in the advances e-HRcan deliver.” Whatcan HR professionals do to make sure their organisation has the right webtechnology?WhileHR professionals look set to become web masters leading the rest of theirorganisation through change, this naturally calls upon them to becomeincreasingly strategic and invest funds in highly complex equipment. A rolewhich Green believes “HR as a profession is traditionally poor atwinning”.  Heasserted that it is vital for HR to understand why they’re buying something –even if it means ignoring the latest technology on the market. “If you’re asupplier then there’s clearly a demand from organisations saying, ‘What newways have you got of doing something?’ “Butit’s still the fundamental question of is it the right tool? Will it make adifference? Will it add value to the organisation? HR needs to drive the debateabout what adds value.”Tribeagreed.  “You need to think aboutmeasurable value first and then work backwards,’ he said. “Forget about ‘e’.The issue is technology. And e-technology or web technology is simply thelatest technology in the same way that Windows-based technology was 10 yearsago. “Inanother 10 years there will be another form of technology, so I think you needto forget about that and concentrate on achieving value.”DavidWimpress, chairman of learning provider KnowledgePool, said HR departmentsshould extend their knowledge about technology as far as possible. “HR leadersneed to have a full understanding of what’s out there for training,” he said.“You need to be sure that you’re getting balanced, subjective output from yourstrategic partners. One of the biggest dangers is putting together nicheplayers who will steer you in the particular direction that conforms with theirown business model.”Thepanel concluded that HR needed to strike a balance between making a start onrelatively small scale Internet projects with the need to ensure that webactivity was adding value.  Burncame down heavily in favour of  making astart. “The reality of it is that I look at my existing budgets, see where Ican find some money and then I get something that’s a paper aeroplane and Ilaunch it. And if I can then demonstrate that the paper aeroplane flies, Iescalate it all and I gather in more resources.”Tribe,however, cautioned against “tinkering with change” and argued that HR webprojects should be integrated with the business.DavidBrain, director of consultancy at KnowledgePool, said that HR professionalsshould trust their instincts. “One of the greatest additional values that HRcan impart to a business is our spirit,” he said. “I think there’s a good casefor being slightly intuitive in management and HR managers are generally prettywise and commercially sensitive.”Wimpresssummed up by saying the Internet is “not a panacea but it is an important newdevelopment in the market”.Howeffective is the Web at training and development? Asa learning medium, the Internet is often criticised for its lack ofinteractivity and the isolation experienced by learners. Wimpress had a clearview on this. “You need to build the interaction of the classroom into thee-learning environment,” he said. One of his organisation’s solutions is 24/7mentoring online.Anotherissue was the content of e-learning. Green insisted that to be successful itneeds to be driven by individual rather than organisational objectives. Tribeagreed. “The Web is either a tool that works or not depending upon the cultureof your organisation – whether people see that it’s important for theirday-to-day work or career development or not. If it is then people willactually make the effort,” he said.Wimpresssaid a good way to do this was to integrate e-learning into the individual’spersonal development plan which can include tools such as competency modelling,skills gap analysis, succession planning and psychometric appraisal. Tribeurged organisations to generate a learning culture so that “people get used toreference-based learning or wanting to learn how to learn”. Kohlerargued that this is one of the biggest challenges faced by HR. As she said, “Oneof the advantages classroom-based training has is that at least people have thedate written in their diary and they know they’re going to be out of theworkplace for a particular amount of time. A problem with online learning isgetting people into the discipline of taking the time out to actually do thetraining.”Whatit boils down to, McLaren said, was understanding the people within theorganisation. “Yes it’s cost effective, and I can easily convince my managersto buy Internet stuff,” he said. “ButI’m still not convinced that we’ve yet got into the mindset of the people whoactually use it. I think that’s the biggest challenge. It’s not the efficiencyof it – it’s the effectiveness.”Thepanel obviously believed that HR was up to the challenge of the Internet. Whenasked whether the Web was a friend or foe to HR a show of hands showed that thepanel was unanimous in the view that the Internet is HR’s friend.BiographiesVictoriaBird, 28, has been in HR for seven years. She started her career as agraduate trainee with Marks & Spencer and has also held managementpositions at Time Warner. She has been at Electronic Arts for two years as HRmanagerDavidBrain, 50, has worked in HR for 25 years. He has previously worked forBedfordshire County Council and is currently director of consultancy forKnowledgepoolPhilipBurn, 48, has worked in HR for 26 years and joined Electronic Arts inDecember 1997. He started his career in 1974 as BAT’s first graduate personneltrainee and has also worked for RCA Records, Ward Brothers, De la Rue andLogica. He is currently the vice-president of European HR for EA PaulCulleton, 44, has been with Johnson & Johnson for five  years and is currently vice-president of HRin their medical devices section. He has previously worked for Burmah Oil,Costain Engineering, Crosfield Electronics and various independentconsultanciesKevinGreen, 38, has been Qtab’s managing director since 1991. During that time,the company has grown by 70 per cent. His clients include Unilever, FirstChoice, DHL International and Smith and NephewAmiraKohler, 29, has worked in HR for eight years and held positions at NetworkSouth East and British Airways. She is currently director of people managementat Metrius BrianMcLaren, 32, is head of training and online learning at the Royal Bank ofScotland Group. He has held various positions in the bank since joining in 1997and previously worked for Computershare ServicesRalphTribe, 32, is vice-president of HR for Getty Images. In 1992 he started asa recruitment and training officer for British Rail and has also worked forRailtrack, Qtab and DACGDavidWimpress, 54, has been executive chairman of KnowledgePool since 1992. Hehas also been HR director of ICL UK, group HR director of De La Rue and the UKHR director for MotorolaChairmanNoel O’Reilly, editor of Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Is the Web a friend to HR?On 13 Mar 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. last_img read more

The spatial distribution of microalgae on Antarctic fellfield soils

first_imgThe horizontal and vertical distributions of cyanobacteria and algae on soil polygons on Signy Island were investigated. Soil chlorophyll concentrations increased from the centre to the edge of the polygons. Similar distributions of the non-motile genera, such as Pseudanabaena and Nostoc, were observed, whereas the motile taxa, Phormidium and Pinnularia, were evenly distributed across the polygon. Phormidium autumnale was the most widespread taxon, and other Oscillatoriaceae were also important, although large differences in community composition between polygons were observed. Most of the algal biomass was concentrated near the surface of the soil, although chlorophyll degradation products were found to depths of up to 8 cm. Examination of the soil profile by fluorescence microscopy indicated that a large proportion of the microflora occurred in the zone 0–1 mm below the surface, and scanning electron microscopy confirmed that few algae occurred on the soil surface. It is suggested that this may be a desiccation-avoidance strategy. Vertical migration of the motile microalgae to the soil surface was not observed in the field, but could be induced in the laboratory in the presence of excess water, although no diel cycle to this movement was observed.last_img read more