Extension for Comesaña and Well

first_imgComesaña’s return was scheduled for mid-March. More or less, the same date for which Well should have been recovered. The playmaker was going to have to stop for about six weeks, after suffering “a tear in the adductor major of the right thigh”. An injury that was made in the course of the match against Extremadura and completely fortuitous, since he received no blow. Who is practically recovered is Velázquez. The defender suffered “a rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament of his left knee” during the preseason, for which he was forced to abandon the concentration and undergo surgery. However, that is already past for the Uruguayan central defender, who has gradually reintegrated with the group. Emi returned to work with her colleagues the week before the last league game, that of Elche. The coronavirus crisis has paralyzed football at all levels, both the competitive and the training routine. The deadlines, today, are unknown and it is impossible to make predictions about when LaLiga will resume. However, this time could be useful for the teams to recover their injured. In the case of Lightning, two would be the main affected: Comesaña and Well. Both continue with their recovery, a goal for which they will have an unexpected extension of days and even weeks.center_img Santi Comesaña’s last game with the Strip was Numancia (2-2) in mid-November Since then, problems in the pubic area have become a real headache for the player. Finally, on January 16, the Galician midfielder had to undergo surgery for a “bilateral inguinal hernia” and the red-headed medical services estimated the discharge time at about two months.last_img read more

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Magic The Gathering community captures card thieves in elaborate sting

first_imgDon’t mess with the Magic: The Gathering community. That’s what a pair of thives learned when they broke into 23-year-old Woodbridge, Virginia resident Kemper Pogue’s car and made off with 300 cards valued at around $8,000.“I went in the house, cracked open a beer, had a few sips and promptly started screaming expletives as I waited for the police to arrive,” he said. “I’d been collecting these cards since I was a kid and over the years they’ve only increased in value. I was horrified.”After filing a report with the local police, Pogue started his own investigation by posting about the stolen cards on various online Magic communities and calling local stores to see if they’d seen or heard of anyone trying to sell the cards. In other words, he started using the tight-knit community revolving around the game and the shops in which it’s sold to get his property back.“There aren’t many physical things that can be taken that has this much sense of community attached to them,” Pogue explained. “Cards have all these memories and conversations with them from people you’ve met all over the country. When Magic players hear that a collection has been stolen, it’s heartbreaking and they rally around each other to get it back.”Image credit: Max MayorovAnd that’s exactly what happened. Pogue’s calls paid off when two men entered a Virginia card shop run by a friend of his wanting to sell cards. The owner referred them to Pogue’s hometown card shop Curio Cavern where they soon brought a portion of the collection to sell. Having been informed of the possible illegal sale, the employee asked the suspected thieves to come back at 8:00PM so they could deal with his boss, Tom Haid.The idea was for the men to show up, get spotted and IDed by the employee and have the cops swoop in to lock them up. But there was one more problem: Haid had a Magic tournament scheduled for that night. When he informed the players at 7:30PM that two criminals — one with a history of using deadly weapons during his robberies — were on the way, everyone remained in place in a show of support for a fellow player.When the suspects showed up a half hour later they were met with a sign saying the shop would reopen in about five minutes. This gave the store employee time to get a good look and give the police the go-ahead. Apprehending the criminals went off without a hitch. Unfortunately, Pogue couldn’t be there to witness the capture in person because he was out of town for a funeral, but he was still enthusiastic about the eventual return of his cards (they’re currently safely ensconced in the police evidence room).“We burned ’em!” he said. “We were one step ahead every step of the way.”last_img read more

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These robobees can dive swim and jump like dolphins

first_imgThese ‘robo-bees’ can dive, swim, and jump like dolphins Puffins, flying fish, and dolphins are naturals in both the air and sea, moving from one to the other with ease. Now, for the first time, a tiny robot is joining their routine. The bee-sized bot, which can fly by flapping its tiny wings, has been re-engineered to dive into water, swim, take off again, and land safely. Once it dries off, the “robo-bee” can repeat the whole routine—or go back to flying. But engineering for water wasn’t easy. The researchers realized early on that their 175-milligram bot needed help staying upright underwater. So they added stabilizing cross beams and slowed down how quickly it beat its wing: In air, the wings flap about 250 times per second; in water, they average about nine beats per second. Any faster than that, and the bot starts to tilt and twist and can even fall apart. The bot also needed help breaking through the water’s surface tension, so the researchers figured out how to give it a push with an electrical device that converts water into oxygen and hydrogen, plus a “sparker” that can ignite these gases. After 2 minutes, the gases build and make the bot buoyant enough to get its wings out of the water. Then the spark blows up the gases, and the bot shoots up about 35 centimeters at a speed of more than 2 meters per second, the researchers report today in Science Robotics. The bot can’t fly again until it dries out, but its design helps it glide to a safe landing. And though it’s unlikely to perform at Sea World, this versatile bot may one day help with ocean search and rescue, fish surveys, and environmental monitoring. By Elizabeth PennisiOct. 25, 2017 , 2:00 PMlast_img read more

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