Ashish creates history with bronze in gymnastics

first_imgAshish Kumar scripted history on Tuesday when he became the first Indian gymnast to clinch an Asian Games medal by securing a bronze in the Men’s Floor event of the Artistic Gymnastics, in Guangzhou on Tuesday.Kumar clinched the bronze with an aggregate of 14.92 behind gold medallists Chenglong Zhang of China and South Korean Soo Myun Kim, who finished at an identical scoreline of 15.40.In the first round, Kumar scored 6.30 points while in the final round, the Indian managed to accumulate 8.62 to finish third in the event.Kumar had finished a disappointing 23rd in a 24-participant field in the final of the men’s individual all-round artistic gymnastics competition yesterday at the Town Gymnasium.The 19-year-old Indian had scripted history last month when he won a silver and a bronze in vault and floor for India in the Commonwealth Games in Delhi.With inputs from PTIlast_img read more

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7 days ago​AC Milan reveal continuing losses for 2018/19

first_imgTagsSerie A NewsAbout the authorIan FerrisShare the loveHave your say ​AC Milan reveal continuing losses for 2018/19by Ian Ferris7 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveAC Milan are set to post a loss of €145.9 million (US$162.3 million ) for the 2018/19 season, according to their latest financial filings, reports, www.sportspromedia.com/.The figure makes for grim reading for the Serie A club, with losses approximately €20 million (US$22.3 million ) greater than the previous year.Revenue has also fallen 6.1 per cent to €241.1 million (US$268.8 million), according to the filing. This is despite an increase in revenue from broadcast rights, which rose from €113.8 million (US$126.9 million) to €113.8 million (US$22.3 million).The decline can partly be attributed to revenues from sponsorship income, which fell from €44.7 million (US$49.6 million) to €38 million (US$42.3 million), player management, down from €42 million (US$46.6 million) to €25.5 million (US$28.4 million) , and competition revenue, which dropped from €35.3 million (US$39.3 million ) to €34.1 million (US$37.8 million).Milan also saw business costs increase, jumping 5.1 per cent to €373 million (US$415 million).Personnel costs rose more than €34 million (US$37.7 million) to €184.8 million (US$205.5 million), with depreciation and amortisation increasing from €86.4 million (US$96.1 million) to €89.1 million (US$99.1 million). last_img read more

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Study suggests singleperson gowning step to help optimize sterile technique in the

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 7 2019For surgeons getting ready to enter the operating room (OR), the chances of contamination may be lower if they put their gowns on by themselves – without the assistance of a surgical technician, according to an experimental study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.Contamination occurs in most two-person assisted gowning procedures, suggests the study by Kenton Panas, MD, and colleagues of The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City. The researchers write, “We suggest a single-person gowning step to help optimize sterile technique in the OR.”.Surgeons Ask, ‘Are We Contaminated Before We Cut?’The researchers designed an experiment to assess possible breaches of sterility during the gowning step before surgery. The study simulated a two-person gowning procedure in which a surgical technician unfolds the gown and holds it open for the surgeon to slide his/her arms through.The potential for contamination was monitored by coating the surgical technician’s gown with a special resin that glows under ultraviolet light. If any of the glowing resin was detected on the surgeon’s gown after the procedure, it was considered a contamination event. Three orthopedic surgeons and three experienced technicians performed a total of 27 gowning procedures.The results showed evidence of cross-contamination in 67 percent of gowning procedures. All areas of contamination, as shown by glowing of the resin under ultraviolet light, were on the sleeves of the surgical gown.The surgeons and technicians were selected based on variations in height: in both groups, one participant was tall, one medium height, and one short. The surgeon’s height was a significant source of variation, with the tallest surgeon having the greatest amount of contamination of the gown of the sleeve.Related StoriesBariatric surgery should be offered to all patients who would benefitSchwann cells capable of generating protective myelin over nerves finds researchAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyThe contamination rate was unaffected by technician’s height, nor by the surgeon’s experience. In fact, the least-experienced surgeon participating in the study had the lowest rate of gown contamination.Following sterile technique is critical for everyone working in the OR. “Any breach of sterile technique can lead to contamination, which ultimately may lead to infection,” the researchers write. This is especially important in orthopaedic surgery because of the frequent use of implantable materials. While several OR procedures have been studied to assess their impact on contamination rates, this is the first study to assess the process of putting on surgical gowns.Cross-contamination of the surgeon’s gown is a common occurrence during the standard two-person assisted gowning procedure, the new findings suggest. The risk of contamination appears greater when gowning taller surgeons – possibly because the longer sleeves are more likely to come into contact with the technician’s gown.While acknowledging their study’s small size, Dr. Panas and coauthors write, “this study identifies a common and overlooked pattern of sterile field contamination.” They suggest that a single-person gowning procedure – where the gown is handed to the surgeon, who then puts it on without assistance – can eliminate this source of contamination and help to optimize sterile technique in the OR.”Postoperative infections can be life changing in the critically ill and can lead to permanent disability, loss of limb, or worse,” Dr. Panas comments. “We hope our work gives surgeons of all specialties one more tool to accomplish our ultimate goal as healthcare providers, which is the optimization of patient care.” Source:http://home.lww.com/news.entry.html/2019/01/04/evaluating_surgeong-q7je.htmllast_img read more

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Extensive genetic tests do not cause undue worry for women with breast

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 5 2019Newer genetic tests introduce more ambiguity, but a new study finds patients are not overreacting to uncertain resultsAs genetic testing for breast cancer has become more complex, evaluating a panel of multiple genes, it introduces more uncertainty about the results. But a new study finds that newer, more extensive tests are not causing patients to worry more about their cancer risk.”Genetic testing is becoming increasingly more complex, but increasingly more precise. This has led to some ambiguity in test results. The challenge is incorporating this information into the treatment decision without causing unnecessary worry,” says lead study author Steven J. Katz, M.D., MPH, professor of general medicine and of health management and policy at the University of Michigan.Related StoriesUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskInitially, genetic testing for breast cancer focused exclusively on BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Now, newer multigene panel tests look for abnormalities in a dozen or more different genes that play some role in breast cancer risk. By testing more genes, it’s more likely a patient will have a positive test or a variant of unknown significance – in other words, something is out of the ordinary but doctors do not know how that impacts cancer risk.The concern is that this greater variation could lead patients to worry too much about their risk of breast cancer recurrence when the genetic testing results are ambiguous.Researchers surveyed 1,063 women treated for early stage breast cancer who had received genetic testing between 2013-2015, the period in which panel testing became more popular. About 60 percent of the patients were tested only for BRCA1 and BRCA2, while 40 percent had the multigene panel test. Patients were asked how much and how often they worried about their cancer coming back and the impact that worry had on their life.Overall, 11 percent of patients reported that cancer worry had a high impact on their life and 15 percent worried often or almost always. Neither the impact nor the frequency of worry varied substantially based on the type of genetic testing or the test results. The study is published in JCO Precision Oncology.”These findings are reassuring,” Katz says. “We found that patients did not overreact whether they got the newer panel testing or BRCA-only testing, and they did not overreact to the test results. Their future cancer worry was not different whether they had a negative test or variant of unknown significance.”Virtually all of the patients surveyed received some form of genetic counseling.”Genetic counseling is essential to maximize the benefit of testing for patients and their families,” says senior study author Allison W. Kurian, M.D., M.Sc., associate professor of medicine and of health research and policy at Stanford University. “But timely counseling after diagnosis of breast cancer is increasingly a challenge because more patients are getting tested and the results are more complex.” Source:https://www.rogelcancercenter.org/news/archive/genetic-testing-does-not-cause-undue-worry-breast-cancer-patientslast_img read more

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Cancer patients are four times more likely to commit suicide

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 14 2019People with cancer are more than four times more likely to commit suicide than people without cancer, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.In a study using data on more than eight million cancer patients in the United States, the researchers also found that among people with cancer, white males; patients who were diagnosed at a younger age; and patients with lung, head and neck, testicular cancer, and lymphomas were more likely to commit suicide.Nicholas Zaorsky, radiation oncologist in the Penn State Cancer Institute, said the study — published today (Jan. 14) in Nature Communications — highlights the importance of a comprehensive approach to treating cancer patients.”Even though cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States, most cancer patients do not die from cancer, the patients usually die of another cause,” Zaorsky said. “There are multiple competing risks for death, and one of them is suicide. Distress and depression can arise from cancer diagnosis, treatment, financial stress, and other causes. Ultimately, distress and depression may lead to suicide. Our goal was to quantify the risk of suicide among cancer patients.”Dr. Zaorsky said that while a lot of progress has been made in treating the cancer itself, not as much work and research has been put into how cancer affects patients mentally and emotionally. The researchers compared the suicide risk of cancer patients versus the general public, and they explored whether certain cancer patients had a higher risk than other patients.The researchers used data gathered from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. SEER includes data about cancer incidence, survival, treatment, and age and year of diagnosis, and covers 28 percent of the US population.For the study, the researchers used SEER data on more than 8.6 million patients who had been diagnosed with invasive cancer — cancer that has spread beyond the tissue in which it originally developed — between 1973 and 2014.Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyResearchers identify potential drug target for multiple cancer typesAfter analyzing the data, the researchers found that 13,311 of the patients in the dataset — 0.15 percent — died by suicide, more than four times the risk of the general population. This is a two-fold increase since a previous study in 2002 that reported a 1.9 increased risk.Additionally, the researchers found that while the risk of suicide decreases five years after a diagnosis, the risk remains high for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancer.”The interesting thing we found was that it does seem to matter at what age a patient is diagnosed and what type of cancer that person has,” Zaorsky said. “Treatments for some cancers — like leukemia and testicular cancer among adolescents and young adults, for example — can decrease a patient’s fertility, and that seems to be one of the risks for suicide in the long term. In contrast, elderly patients who are diagnosed with lung, prostate, and head and neck cancers, are at an increased risk of suicide for the remainder of their life. “The researchers said the results could be used to help identify patients that may be at a higher risk for suicide and help health care providers tailor their treatments accordingly.”This information could be helpful while developing guidelines and strategies for how and when to screen cancer patients for depression and distress,” Zaorsky said. “For example, aiming suicide-prevention strategies at older patients and those with certain cancers, such as prostate, lung, leukemias and lymphomas, may be beneficial.”Additionally, Zaorsky said the study could help clinicians develop survivorship programs, which aim to care for and improve the quality of life for cancer patients that have gone through treatment and are on their way to recovery. Source:https://news.psu.edu/story/553921/2019/01/14/research/suicide-risk-more-quadruples-people-cancerlast_img read more

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New research on psychological and neural basis of PostTraumatic Stress Disorder

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 12 2019Dr. Stephen Maren, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, recently published significant research on the psychological and neural basis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), one of the most-cited scientific journals in the world, the study looked at the areas of the brain that regulate emotion, including ceasing fear once danger has passed. Other factors, such as stress, can cause extinguished emotions of fear to relapse, which poses an issue for those with PTSD.Related StoriesTransobturator sling surgery shows promise for stress urinary incontinenceDogs and cats relieve academic stress and lift students’ mood, according to a new studyAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementia”Fear relapse represents a significant problem for individuals suffering from stress- and trauma-related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder,” according to the study.Maren’s study examined the neurons in the brain that cause fear relapse, and the influence of stress on these fear-reducing regions of the brain. The data reveals new insight into the pathophysiology of PTSD, and may be able to help predict and prevent fear relapse with treatments that reduce the effects of stress on the brain.”The work shows that stress increases the activity of fear-promoting regions of the prefrontal cortex, while at the same time reducing activity in neighboring fear-reducing regions,” Maren said. “This shift in brain activity could be mimicked by increasing the activity of neurons that release the fight-or-flight neurotransmitter, norepinephrine. This finding paves the way for new treatments that reduce fear and its relapse after therapy.”​ Source:https://today.tamu.edu/2019/04/10/new-study-advances-treatment-options-for-ptsd/last_img read more

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Protein Clumps In ALS Neurons Provide Potential Target For New Therapies

first_imgALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, affects more than 20,000 Americans. Currently, there are no effective treatments for ALS, largely due to poor understanding of how the disease initiates and progresses at the molecular level. The disease is invariably fatal. Source:University of California – San DiegoJournal reference:Fang, M. et al. (2019) Small-Molecule Modulation of TDP-43 Recruitment to Stress Granules Prevents Persistent TDP-43 Accumulation in ALS/FTD. Neuron. doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2019.05.048 While these findings still need to be tested in model organisms and there is more work to do before a potential therapy could one day be tested in patients, these compounds already expand our toolbox for unraveling the relationship between RNA-protein aggregations and neurological disease.”Mark Fang, PhD, Study First Author, UC San Diego Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 2 2019Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurological condition that affects motor neurons — the nerve cells that control breathing and muscles. Under a microscope, researchers have noticed that the motor neurons of patients with ALS contain excessive aggregation of a protein called TDP-43. Since TDP-43 proteins stuck in these aggregates can’t perform their normal function, the scientists believe this build-up contributes to motor neuron degeneration, the hallmark of ALS.In a study publishing July 1, 2019 in Neuron, UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers discovered that prolonged cellular stress, such as exposure to toxins, triggers TDP-43 clumping in the cytoplasm of human motor neurons grown in a laboratory dish. Even after the stress is relieved, TDP-43 clumping persists in ALS motor neurons, but not in healthy neurons.The team then screened and identified chemical compounds (potential precursors to therapeutic drugs) that prevent this stress-induced, persistent TDP-43 accumulation. These compounds also increased the survival time of neurons with TDP-43 proteins containing an ALS-associated mutation.”These compounds could provide a starting point for new ALS therapeutics,” said senior author Gene Yeo, PhD, professor at UC San Diego School of Medicine and faculty member in the Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine.Yeo and team, including first author Mark Fang, PhD, who was a graduate student in Yeo’s lab at the time, generated motor neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that had been converted from human skin cells. To mimic cellular aspects of ALS, they exposed these laboratory motor neurons to toxins such as puromycin, which stressed the cells and led to TDP-43 clumps.Related StoriesScientists discover hundreds of protein-pairs through coevolution studyNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerQuorn protein stimulates muscle building to a greater extent than milk proteinNormally, TDP-43 proteins help process molecules called messenger RNA, which serve as the genetic blueprints for making proteins. But when they clump outside the nucleus, TDP-43 proteins can’t perform their normal duty, and that can have a profound effect on many cellular functions.The researchers tested thousands of chemical compounds for their effects on RNA-protein aggregation. They were surprised to find compounds that not only reduced the overall amount of clumping by up to 75 percent, but also varied clump size and number per cell.Some of the compounds tested were molecules with extended planar aromatic moieties — arms that allow them to insert themselves in nucleic acids, such as DNA and RNA. TDP-43 must bind RNA in order to join ALS-associated clumps. Thus, according to Yeo, it makes sense that a compound that interacts with RNA would prevent TDP-43 from clumping.last_img read more

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Judge approves Elon Musk settlement with SEC

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The Securities and Exchange Commission argued the tweet was misleading and harmed investors who bought stock in the electric car company as a result. The company is not going private.Tesla and Musk, the company’s CEO, agreed to pay a total of $40 million in fines in the settlement Tuesday. The settlement allows Musk to hold on to his CEO post, but he will give up his seat as Tesla’s chairman for at least three years.As part of the agreement, Tesla also must clamp down on Musk’s communications with investors. The company will be required to appoint an independent chairman and directors with no direct ties to Musk. Explore further Citation: Judge approves Elon Musk settlement with SEC (2018, October 16) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-elon-musk-settlement-sec.html A federal judge is approving a settlement between Elon Musk and federal regulators over his infamous tweet about taking Tesla private. Shareholders must vote on Musk’s return as Tesla chairman © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Boeing unveils fix to flight system after deadly crashes

first_imgBoeing employees work on a 737 MAX jet at the company’s factory in Renton, Washington—the aviation giant has unveiled a fix to the software system of the jet, which has suffered two deadly crashes in recent months Embattled aviation giant Boeing pledged Wednesday to do all it can to prevent crashes like the two that killed nearly 350 people in recent months, as it unveiled a fix to the flight software of its grounded 737 MAX aircraft. Timeline of the history of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft since its certification by the US Federal Aviation Administration in 2017 US regulators under fire, Boeing launches charm offensive Boeing’s vice president of product strategy, Mike Sinnett, presented the flight software fix for the company’s embattled 737 MAX passenger jet Boeing gathered hundreds of pilots and reporters to unveil the changes to the MCAS stall prevention system, which has been implicated in the tragedies in Ethiopia and Indonesia, as part of a charm offensive to restore the company’s reputation.”We are going to do everything to make sure that accidents like this don’t happen again,” Mike Sinnett, Boeing’s vice president of product strategy, told reporters at a factory in Washington state.Meanwhile, across the country in the nation’s capital, the head of the US air safety agency faced harsh questions from senators over its relationship with and oversight of Boeing.Dan Elwell, the acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration, defended his agency but acknowledged that as systems become more complex, the FAA’s “oversight approach needs to evolve.”Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao and other top officials were also on the hot seat on Capitol Hill.Boeing chief Dennis Muilenburg was not called to the Senate hearing, but is expected to testify at a later date. Among the changes, the MCAS will no longer repeatedly make corrections when the pilot tries to regain control, and will be automatically disconnected in the event of disagreements between the two “angle of attack” (AOA) sensors, the company said. Explore further Citation: Boeing unveils fix to flight system after deadly crashes (2019, March 27) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-boeing-unveils-flight-deadly.html Ahead of the tough questioning, the company launched a campaign to convince the flying public that it is addressing the issues with the 737 MAX, including a fix to the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) implicated in the deadly crashes. At the company’s massive factory in Renton, Washington, Boeing unveiled the software changes and offered reassurances.Sinnett said it will take only about an hour to install the updates and they can begin as soon as regulators authorize the changes, which were developed “after months of testing and hundreds of hours.”Authorization pendingThe MCAS, which makes the aircraft dive in order to regain speed if it detects a stall or loss of airspeed, was developed specifically for the 737 MAX, which has a heavier engine than its predecessor, the 737 NG. This is a major change because until the Ethiopian Airlines tragedy earlier this month, the MCAS was set to react to information from a single sensor and would repeatedly override pilot corrections.The initial investigation into the Lion Air crash in Indonesia in October found that one of the AOA sensors failed but continued to transmit erroneous information to the MCAS.Boeing also will install a warning feature—at no cost —- called a “disagree light” to indicate to the pilot when the left and right AOA sensors are out of sync.The company also is revising pilot training, including for those already certified on the 737, to provide “enhanced understanding of the 737 MAX” flight system and crew procedures. Workers stand under the wing of a Boeing 737 MAX airplane at the company’s factory in Renton, Washington In his prepared testimony, he called on the agency to tighten oversight of companies that self-certify.But a Boeing official countered that wholesale changes were not needed, saying: “In general, the process has worked and continues to work, and we see no reason to overhaul the process.” The FAA—which delegates some certification procedures to Boeing, including for parts of the MAX—was “directly involved” in the safety review of the MCAS, Elwell said.”The certification process was detailed and thorough,” but “time yields more data,” he added.A Boeing official meanwhile said there was no need to revamp a regulatory process that has “continued to lead to safer and safer airplanes.”At a separate hearing, Chao said she was “concerned about any allegations of coziness with any company,” but noted that allowing Boeing to handle some of its own safety certifications was necessary because the FAA “can’t do it on their own.”She said she has ordered the Transportation Department’s inspector general, Calvin Scovel, to investigate the MAX certification, and Scovel in turn noted various concerns with FAA inspectors and procedures. US pilots complained after the Lion Air crash that they had not been fully briefed on the system.’Directly involved’In Washington, US aviation regulators faced questions about how certification for the MAX was handled.Lawmakers also want to know why officials did not immediately ground the aircraft after an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX 8 crashed shortly after takeoff near Addis Ababa on March 10, killing all 157 people onboard.The delay has given rise to suspicions of a too-cozy relationship between regulators and the American plane maker, especially since Chinese and European authorities moved quickly to ban the planes as soon as similarities with the Lion Air crash were raised. Southwest is one of the airlines that flies the now grounded 737 MAX aircraft Boeing 737 MAX deliveries and orders, per region and company © 2019 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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CBI row Tweets on fudged documents a mistake admits Bhushan

first_imgMarch 07, 2019 courts and legal Published on SC disposes plea challenging Rao’s appointment as interim CBI chief Advocate Prashant Bhushan on Thursday admitted before the Supreme Court that he made a “genuine mistake” by tweeting that the government had perhaps submitted fabricated minutes of a meeting of the high-powered selection committee on appointment of M Nageswara Rao as an interim CBI director.Attorney General K K Venugopal told a bench comprising justices Arun Mishra and Navin Sinha that in view of Bhushan’s statement, he would like to withdraw his contempt plea filed against the noted lawyer.However, Bhushan filed an application in the court seeking recusal of Justice Arun Mishra from hearing the contempt petition filed by Venugopal.Bhushan also refused to tender an unconditional apology before the bench for seeking Justice Mishra’s recusal.Venugopal told the court that he stood by his earlier statement that he did not want any punishment for Bhushan in the matter.The bench, however, said it would consider the larger issue of whether a person can criticise the court in a sub-judice matter to influence public opinion.The bench posted the matter for further hearing on April 3. Latest trendThe top court had earlier said that it would examine if a person can criticise the court in a sub-judice matter to influence the public opinion which may interfere with the course of justice and added that now-a-days it has become a trend for the lawyers appearing in a sub-judice matter to make statements in the media and participate in TV debates.It had said the court is not averse to media reporting of cases but lawyers appearing in sub-judice matters should restrain themselves from making public statements.Contempt plea Bhushan had said in his tweets that government appeared to have misled the top court and perhaps submitted fabricated minutes of meeting of the high-powered selection committee headed by Prime Minister Narendra Modi.The court had issued notice to Bhushan and sought his reply on the contempt plea within three weeks.The Centre has also filed a separate contempt plea against Bhushan for his February 1 tweets.Venugopal had earlier pointed out in the apex court that when the matter challenging the appointment of Rao was pending, Bhushan had gone public and made a statement that the government has allegedly misled the court by producing a fabricated document.Ten social activists, including Aruna Roy, Arundhati Roy and Shailesh Gandhi, have also come out in support of Bhushan in the apex court, contending that the contempt proceedings initiated against him appeared to be an assault on freedom of speech and expression. Besides, a separate application has also been filed in the top court by five senior journalists, including former Union minister Arun Shourie, seeking to intervene in the case. SHARE SHARE EMAIL RELATED However, the bench to consider the larger issue of whether a person can criticise the court in a sub-judice matter to influence public opinion SHARE COMMENT CBI Advocate Prashant Bhushan COMMENTSlast_img read more

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