Jessica Jensen’s Electric Vehicle Journal: Driving From Olympia To Seattle

first_imgSubmitted by Jessica JensenIn my first installment of the EV Journal I introduced you to my all-electric Nissan Leaf, which I have (appropriately) named “Leif.”  This installment will focus on charging stations and how I’m learning to plan for long-distance driving – including roundtrips to Seattle.Here’s the scoop on charging stations.  Charging stations come in 3 types.  A Standard Charging Station is 110 volts, which is typically a heavy-duty, commercial outdoor electrical outlet and takes almost 24 hours to fully charge.  These stations have been around for several years now and these are what you find (along with a dedicated parking space) at many forward-thinking businesses in town such as grocery stores and banks and some government offices.  But you can use any 110 volt outlet really.A Level 2 Charging Station is 220 volts (similar to an electric range or clothes dryer but with a specialized outlet and plug) and takes overnight to fully charge.  Many parking garages, government offices and businesses now have Level 2 Charging Stations (along with dedicated EV parking) for patrons and employees.  This is also the type of charging station I have at home.  Because I was an early EV purchaser, my home charging station was installed free of charge.A Fast-Charge Station (sometimes called Level 3) is 440 DC power.  This fully charges Leif in 20-30 minutes, depending on how much juice I have left when I start.Because Seattle is a 60-mile trip, until this month I only took Leif to Seattle when I knew I was staying overnight.  For example, my partner Mark and I spent a lovely New Year’s Eve in Seattle last year where we parked Leif overnight in the hotel parking garage and then hoofed it around town.  Leif was all charged and ready for the trip home the next day.  But that limitation is gone with the installation of 3 Fast Charge Stations in Seattle – one at the Discovery Center on Westlake, another at a Fred Meyer on the north end of Seattle and the third (my favorite) at Harvard Market just off Broadway east of I-5 near downtown Seattle.  Last week I had 3 opportunities to go to Seattle which provided a great opportunity to get some experience under my belt working out the kinks of the Olympia-Seattle run.First, I have to be fully charged before I leave home (meaning, Leif shows I have a range of over 100 miles).  On one of the days I did a few errands before leaving Olympia and decided to stop in SeaTac to recharge at a Level 2 for a half hour.  I only got an additional 4 miles, but that gave me enough juice to finish the trip to Seattle without worry.  Next I have to be careful about using accessories.I am testing different things to see what creates the most drain on the batteries.  Using the radio doesn’t seem to be much of a drain, but for some reason the hands-free cell phone function (which includes a dashboard phone directory uplinked from my iPhone that automatically hooks my iPhone to my car speakers) seems to draw down the batteries.  Quick calls seem fine but extended calls appear to take a lot of juice.  I’ve also observed that driving north appears to take more juice than driving south.  It’s too soon to say what this is about – could be anything from topography to the weather so I’ll keep tabs on this for a while until I can figure out why.Last, I have to build in extra time for charging along the way and for charging before I return home.  I should be able to charge just once at a Fast Charge Station for the trip home, but if I do side trips along the way, I’ll definitely need to stop for a charge.  When I do need to charge, I answer my email or I can hop into a local store while Leif is charging.My parents were born in 1916.  I remember their stories of long trips by car in the early days of the automobile and how they would bring several extra tubes for the tires, a spare tire and extra gasoline.  Roads weren’t paved and you could expect to change at least a couple of flats each way.  There weren’t always gas stations (and certainly not any open 24 hours) so you had to bring extra fuel in case you ran out.  You need to plan additional time just to get there.As an EV pioneer, I feel a little like my parents did in the early days of the automobile.  The EV Highway is only partially built, coffee shops still outnumber charging stations, and I need to build in time to get from here to there.  It’s an effort I’m willing to make to drive a car that has zero emissions, doesn’t use gas, and costs less than $4 for a roundtrip to Seattle.Jessica Jensen is an attorney and principal of Jessica Jensen Law PS in Olympia.  Her holistic, collaborative practice focuses on business, real estate, wills, trusts and estates and uncontested family law.  You can reach her at jessica@jessicajensenlaw.com or 705-1335. Facebook12Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

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Michael Vaughan: Only India have the tools to beat Australia at home in tests

first_imgAdvertisement vg5NBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs24d3fWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Egfoqx( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) bgroWould you ever consider trying this?😱cCan your students do this? 🌚bteohRoller skating! Powered by Firework Former England captain, Michael Vaughan believes that only Virat Kohli’s Indian team has the qualities to defeat Australia in their own backyard. The Aussies dominated in both the T20I and Test series against Pakistan as the visitors couldn’t match the former’s lethal pace attack. The hosts beat a dismal Pakistani side 2-0 in the T20I series before whitewashing them again in the Test series.Advertisement Getty ImagesFollowing Australia’s second Test victory, Vaughan twitted: “This Australian Team in these conditions are going to take some beating … Only India have the tools to do so at this stage… #AUSvPAK.”Advertisement Spinner Nathan Lyon scalped five wickets as the Kangaroos brushed aside Pakistan by an innings and 48 runs in the final Test of the two-match series on Monday.“Really happy. Barring few slip-ups in the field yesterday, we played excellent cricket over the last two matches. We came back from England, we felt, we were getting better all the time. We wanted our batters to score big runs, when your six seven and eight are not facing lot of balls then your top-order is doing fine. David (Warner) and Marnus (Labuschagne) have been unbelievably good.” Aussie skipper Tim Paine said at the post-match conference. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Fast-moving Fire Destroys Little Silver Home

first_imgUPDATED STORYBy John BurtonPhotos by Scott LongfieldLITTLE SILVER — Carriage House Way is a narrow little street off of Silverside Avenue that the casual passerby might not even notice.But last Saturday, the street filled with emergency vehicles as a raging fire claimed a 120 year old house, the home of a family of six and two cats.Police and fire officials received a call about the fire at approximately 1:16 p.m. last Saturday Police Chief Daniel Shaffrey said.“When the first patrol arrived on the scene, it was going pretty good,” Shaffrey said on Monday. “It had already breached the house. It was external.”By that point, “It was a wall of flames,”he said.The home belonged to Joseph and Donna Loftus, who lived there with their four children, two of whom are college age and away at school.Firefighters from the local department were joined by members of the Long Branch, Oceanport, Fair Haven, Neptune, Wayside, West Long Branch departments, many of which were contacted because they had sufficiently tall aerial ladder trucks to reach the house’s upper floors, if needed, as they fought the blaze, according to Shaffrey.Also on hand, the chief said, were representatives of the Red Cross, the Monmouth County Fire Marshal; and Red Bank’s fire department which provided on-call assistance while the local department was occupied.According to the initial investigation, it appears that the fire started in the kitchen, located in the northeast front corner of the house, when lit candles ignited window curtains in the kitchen, which accelerated pretty quickly, Shaffrey said.Donna Loftus was home with two housekeepers at the time and they were making preparations for a party that evening, the chief said. One of the Loftus’s sons ran outside to all 911.The fire destroyed the home, Shaffrey said. “It was a total loss.”The age of the home and its style of construction contributed to the rapid spread of the fire and the extensive damage it caused, officials said.The home was a Queen Ann-style Victorian. said Carolynn Ozar-Diakon, a family friend who sold the family the home.Houses of that age relied on what Shaffrey called balloon frame construction which did not incorporate fire breaks to slow the spread of a fire. “Which would explain the rapid acceleration,” he said.Those in the house were able to escape unharmed, though the two family cats have not been found, Shaffrey said.One firefighter received burns for which he was treated and released, the chief said.On Monday fire department members and a demolition company were on site to go through the building extinguishing any remaining “hot spots,” Shaffrey said.“It looked like as nasty a house fire as you could get,” said Mayor Robert Neff Jr., who knows the family through their children and school activities. Neff arrived as the fire was being brought under control, standing on the front lawn with Joseph Loftus, as Loftus thanked the fire members and police for their hard work. “He was grateful,” Neff said, “and couldn’t have said nicer things about everyone.”“Now the work starts as they try to get back on their feet,” after losing all of their personal effects, Neff noted.To that end, Ozar-Diakon and the local PTO have commenced a campaign to assist the family, collecting gift cards.“Obviously, they are not without means, they have insurance,” Ozar-Diakon said, but noting, “when your house burns down, everything you own is inside of it,” such as ID’s, credit cards, check books, clothing. “I thought gift cards would be a really good stopgap for them,” she said.Ozar-Diakon also thought people may like to help the Loftuses with Christmas decorations. “Because they’re going to be in a rental somewhere,” she said. “Not a very nice thing to happen right before Christmas.”The family is currently staying with friends, Ozar-Diakon said. And they hope to find something permanent in Little Silver, according to Neff.“I think they’re a little a little bit in shock,” she said, “but they realize they have to get on with what’s in front of them now.”Anyone wishing to donate decorations or gift cards can contact Ozar-Diakon at her office, 112 East River Road, Rumson.last_img read more

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Middletown North Senior Wins $20,000 Scholarship

first_imgBy Elizabeth WulfhorstMIDDLETOW­N–Sydney Closs hasn’t decided where she will attend college next fall, but thanks to the Samsung American Legion Scholarship, she has $20,000 to help pay for it.Closs, a senior at Middletown High School North (MHSN), was one of only ten students nationwide who received the scholarship, available to direct descendants of wartime veterans eligible for American Legion membership. Closs’ maternal grandfather, Daniel Malone, served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War.In 1995, Samsung gave the American Legion a $5 million endowment for the establishment of a scholarship fund for family members of U.S. citizens who are war veterans. According to the American Legion, “the gesture was inspired by the support of the U.S. troops that came to the aid of South Korea while defending themselves against opposing Chinese and North Korean forces.”“Words cannot express my gratitude to Samsung and the American Legion,” said Closs. “When I received the call last week I was so excited I could hardly speak. This scholarship acknowledges my hard work and my grandfather’s service to our country and I know he would be very proud if he were still alive.”In order to even be considered for the scholarship, Closs first had to be nominated by teachers and administrators at MHSN to attend the American Legion’s Auxiliary Girls State program.According to the American Legion website, each state holds a “nonpartisan program that teaches young women responsible citizenship.” During this “intensive week of study,” girls work together to learn about their state government. Candidates to the program are selected based on academic achievement, leadership, patriotism, community involvement, extracurricular activities. A similar program is held each year for boys.During each state program, one student is nominated to apply for the scholarship. Nominees must then complete an application similar to a college application, providing transcripts, a résumé and answering essay questions. Closs’ essay topics were about the most significant challenges in her life, and her long term goals for school and career. According to the American Legion, each applicant is selected based on his or her application and their involvement in school and community activities, academic record and financial need.Of the 100 applicants, ten receive $20,000 each, while all others receive a smaller monetary award, this year $750. She was one of two New Jerseyans to win the scholarship; the other is a resident of West Deptford. The other eight recipients come from other parts of the country.Closs is currently at the top of her class academically and has been a competitive swimmer since the 4th grade. She swims on the MHSN team and for the Red Bank YMCA Aqua Rockets and volunteers as a swim coach Special Olympics. Closs is interested in studying math and astrophysics in college.last_img read more

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Sea Wall Plan Can Move Forward

first_imgNo date has been set to begin the project and Hanja explained, “The contractor’s schedule, to some degree, dictates when this can get started.”Monmouth Beach’s civil engineer, Bonnie Heard, said there are environmental restrictions for that water-front area, preventing the work to proceed from the end of March until September. “I would think September,” the project would move forward, Heard suspected.“We’re concerned about the timing impacting our summer beach season,” Long acknowledged. “But we have assurances from the DEP that they will work with us to minimize any negative impact.”Long said a pre-construction meeting was planned with the contractor and borough and state officials later this week.The stone seawall dates back to at least the early 1940s, according to some sources. It was built to protect the tracks for the Central Jersey Railroad, which ran a line along Ocean Avenue from Sandy Hook to Long Branch.The wall’s gap in Sea Bright was to accommodate the Octagon Hotel, a large beachfront resort at the time.This article was first published in the April 6-13, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times. “Sea Bright has identified this as a critical project going forward after Sandy because of the damage that we sustained during the storm surge,” said Sea Bright Mayor Dina Long this week.During Sandy, that gap in Sea Bright’s wall created a funnel effect accelerating the velocity of the water, with the tidal surge rushing into the downtown commercial and residential properties in the area. That surge and flooding caused millions of dollars in damages, in some cases destroying structures, and displacing residents and business owners for many months.Monmouth Beach had less damage than Sea Bright, but damage nonetheless. Howard remembered that, because of the open area, “FEMA knows more damage was sustained coming from the ocean at the bathing pavilion down Valentine Street.” She believes it motivated the federal agency to advance this project. “By closing these gaps, it will absolutely protect these areas,” said Monmouth Beach Mayor Susan Howard.The project was initially announced in August 2014. According to the DEP’s press release at the time, the state would contribute $8.5 million toward the overall approximate $28 million project and it was expected to go out to bid later in 2014 with construction commencing in 2016. FEMA and the state DEP are cooperating in a project, originally announced in 2014, that would build a new section of the pro- tective sea wall in the area of the Monmouth Beach bathing pavilion on Ocean Avenue. Photo by Nikole J. GhirardiThe project, however, was stalled by a lawsuit brought by one of the contract bidders, which objected to the criteria the DEP used to award the contract to another company, the lowest bidder, with the plaintiff also arguing the winning contractor’s bid was materially deficient because it failed to meet the contract specifications. The Appellate Court on March 29 rejected the argument, ruling in favor of the state and the winning contractor, JFC Construction, Jersey City.As the legal wrangling played out, the DEP installed a temporary metal sheet wall in the gap area in Sea Bright as a stopgap measure, according to Long.Lawrence Hanja, a DEP spokesman, said the contractor was notified following the court ruling and, “We’ll be looking to mobilize to begin the process as soon as possible.” By John Burton | The long-delayed protective sea wall project will proceed in both Sea Bright and Monmouth Beach, following last week’s ruling by a state Superior Appellant Court.The court ruled in favor of the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) in a lawsuit brought by one of the project bidders. The ruling now allows the protracted repair and building project to finally move forward on portions of the stone sea wall running along Ocean Avenue/Route 36 in Monmouth Beach and Sea Bright.The project is being done in cooperation with the DEP and with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and would repair portions of the wall damaged by Super Storm Sandy on Oct. 29, 2012.Along with patching and repairing sections of the wall, the major portion of the project involves constructing the wall in stretches where it hadn’t previously existed. In Sea Bright that area is the approximately 1,000-foot stretch on the eastern side of Ocean Avenue facing the public beach in the downtown business district. In Monmouth Beach, plans call for the construction of a 675-foot section of wall in the vicinity of the Monmouth Beach bathing pavilion, a borough-owned and operated beach and pool club at 29 Ocean Ave.last_img read more

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RiverCenter Envisions Renewed Riverfront, Transit Village

first_imgBy Chris Rotolo |RED BANK –At Red Bank RiverCenter’s third strategic planning meeting, municipal planning consultant Bill Fontana revealed a draft of a vision statement local business owners and stakeholders hope will secure a bright future for the borough’s downtown business district.The one-sheet statement identified six transformative strategies to help Red Bank thrive over the next decade, but came coupled with a warning.“I will tell you, that is a lot (of strategies),” said Fontana, the executive director of the Harrisburg-based Pennsylvania Downtown Center, a nonprofit organization that provides revitalization help to downtown districts across the nation.“There are not a ton of towns that can take six strategies and really be effective in implementing all of them. I think that is a bit of a concern and something we need to talk to the Red Bank RiverCenter about,” said Fontana to the several dozen stakeholders who attended the meeting held at the Two River Theater.Despite his caution, Fontana said all six strategies were valid options for the borough to capitalize on.They include:A Reimagined and Reinvigorated Riverfront: The strategy aims to build upon the borough’s historic connection to the Navesink River – as well as its proximity to the Jersey Shore – by providing greater access to year-round active and passive activities on the water, as well the lush green space along the river’s bank, including the development of boating sites, riverfront dining and living options, and water-based recreation.A Regional Center for the Arts and Creativity: With the Count Basie and Two River theaters garnering so much attention and further support provided by art galleries, performance venues and live music settings, the borough has become one of the state’s most notable artistic hubs and could serve as a more accessible destination for artists of all mediums to find a home.A Place for Unique Dining and Shopping Experiences: Diversity in retail and dining options is key for the borough, which could expand on its offering of the latest fashions, finest jewelry, the best in home decor and an already storied antique district to provide an even more unique and immersive shopping and dining experience.An NJ Transit Village: Utilizing its historic and architecturally significant train station and surrounding structures and capitalizing on its proximity to New York City, the borough’s central business district could create roadways that are more friendly to pedestrians, bicyclists, commuters and motorists, appealing to those in search of a more residential living experience.A Center for Health and Wellness in Central New Jersey: With Riverview Medical Center positioned nearby, the borough could seek commercial, retail and experiential opportunities for those in search of well-being and good health, transforming Red Bank into a regional epicenter for health and wellness.A Center for Financial Services: The borough’s location near major centers of trade and commerce, as well as the significant disposable income of residents and patrons from surrounding communities, make Red Bank a viable candidate to become a dynamic hub for banking and financial services.The strategies were derived from a series of surveys and questionnaires that helped gauge the local perception of the borough.Fontana revealed the results of those community outreach efforts at Red Bank RiverCenter’s (RRRC) Aug. 13 strategic planning meeting, findings he said informed the creation of this vision statement draft, and spoke to the organization’s wishes to make the borough a destination for experiences.“I think what Jim (Scavone) and the folks on the Red Bank RiverCenter board were interested in was this whole idea about making Red Bank a center for experiences, whether those are art experiences, theater experiences, concerts, street fairs, escape rooms. These are all tactics and things that will happen as a result of buying into the vision statement,” Fontana said.Fontana said a full-scale commitment to the vision statement from business owners, stakeholders, borough officials and government leaders is the only way it will come to fruition.“I will tell you, unequivocally, the things that keep communities from attaining their vision are always, always, always organizational issues. It is rarely a question of money, because if you have a good plan, people will fund your effort. But if you fight over things and don’t have your act together, there just aren’t enough resources anymore to support initiatives if everyone isn’t rowing in the same direction,” Fontana added.Fontana said he’s confident interested parties could work together toward this common goal, a sentiment shared by RRRC executive director James Scavone, who cited the recent partnership between his organization and the Borough of Red Bank.According to Scavone, the entities will work together to complete a study on the municipality’s alarming parking situation, which was identified via survey and focus group discussion as a potential pitfall that could derail the RRRC vision.“I think over the past year we’ve definitely seen a shift in the relationship between the RiverCenter and some members of the borough and, more recently with this study, it’s become even more apparent,” Scavone said. “I think we’re in the right moment in time for this partnership to take fuller form and help effect some of the changes we talked about tonight.”RRRC will hold its final strategic planning meeting Monday, Oct. 15 following a Sept. 24 parking study meeting at the Red Bank middle school.This article was first published in the Sept. 13 – 19, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Mallard’s Source for Sports Team of Week – U13 Selects

first_imgIt’s not every day a team from Nelson wins a silver medal at the B.C. Provincial B Cup. But that’s just what happened when the Nelson Selects shocked the tournament before losing out to Prince George 2-0 in the gold medal final of the U13 Boy’s Division last month in Powell River. The Selects joined the U18 Boys from Nelson Youth Soccer as medalists. The U18 Selects also won Silver.Mallard’s Source for Sports would like to add to the celebration with Team of the Week honours. The team includes, back row, L-R, assistant manager Damien Engelbrecht, Oscar Seagram, assistant coach Simon Lintz, Joey Timmermans, Akira Engelbrecht, Stryder Scott, Guus Lammers, Sam Barrett, coach Paul Dawson and manager Maya Engelbrecht. Middle, Andrew Falcone, Taylor Pritchard, Ben Woodward, Nigel Ziegler, team captain Quinn Dawson, Bryce Twible and Darian Johnson.Front, goalkeeper Parker Shaw-Lintz.last_img read more

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Birchbank’s McKay tops Balfour as West Kootenay Junior Golf Season opens

first_imgTyler McKay teed off the 2013 West Kootenay Junior Golf Circuit with a win Saturday at the Balfour Golf Course.The Birchbank player fired a 3-over-par 75 to win the 18-hole tournament going away.Brenan Moroney of Birchbank was second at 82 with David Launier of Rock Creek and Trevor Browell tied for third at 85.Launier defeated Browell on the first playoff hole to capture the 15-16-year-old division crown.Moroney won the 17-18-year-old category.Nathan Griffioen of Creston, with an 88 edged Aiden Browell of Champion Lake by a stroke to claim the under-14 division. The circuit shifts to Christina Lake Sunday.Rossland Royals win local high school tournamentThe Rossland Royals combined for a team total 335 to win the top prize at the J. Lloyd Crowe/Rossland Royals High School Invitational Golf Tournament Friday at Birchbank Golf and Country Club.It was the third tournament win of the season for the Royals, finishing the day with a team total 335. J Lloyd Crowe Hawks took second at 359 followed in third by Nakusp at 364.Eight teams flocked to the Birchbank course for the tournament.Most players struggled through the 18 holes with Rossland’s Braden McKay winning the low gross title with an 80.Brenan Moroney and Tyler McKay both tied for second with 82’s.Crowe’s Ryan Fullerton finished fourth overall with an 84 while teammate Alex Rugg took eighth with an 88.last_img read more

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Wire to wire Zone One West Kootenay Junior Golf title for Birchbank’s Tyler McKay

first_imgHowever, McKay played the afternoon round in one over par to finished the tournament one under par and three shots better than Braden McKay. Moroney finished third in the tour championship and secured top spot for the season in the 17 and 18 year division. Braden McKay was top player in the 15 and 16 year division and Aiden Browell took home the trophy for the 14 and under division. Carson Arcuri from Granite Point was awarded the prestigious Emily Beauchamp Award.  This is given to the player who best demonstrates ability, sportsmanship, dedication and improvement. A number of local juniors will be continuing their competitive schedules very soon.  Tyler and Braden McKay will be attempting to qualify for the US Junior next week.David Launier, Brenan, Tyler, Braden, Carson and Isaac Janzen will all be playing the BC Junior Golf Championships July 2-5 at the Revelstoke July 2 – 5 Revelstoke Golf & Country Club, Revelstoke – See more at: http://www.britishcolumbiagolf.org/competition-rules/championship-schedule-2/#sthash.922wJEJ7.dpuf July 2 – 5 Revelstoke Golf & Country Club, Revelstoke – See more at: http://www.britishcolumbiagolf.org/competition-rules/championship-schedule-2/#sthash.922wJEJ7.dpuf July 2 – 5 Revelstoke Golf & Country Club, Revelstoke – See more at: http://www.britishcolumbiagolf.org/competition-rules/championship-schedule-2/#sthash.922wJEJ7.dpuf July 2 – 5 Revelstoke Golf & Country Club, Revelstoke – See more at: http://www.britishcolumbiagolf.org/competition-rules/championship-schedule-2/#sthash.922wJEJ7.dpufJeff Ashton and Jake Kolodychuk will be playing in the BC Juvenile August 20 – 22 at the Crown Isle Golf Resort in Courtenay.. Tyler McKay concluded the Zone One West Kootenay Junior Golf circuit the way he started – with a victory.The Birchank golfer fired a 1-under-par 107 to edge Brenan Moroney and capture the Zone One West Kootenay Junior Golf title Sunday at the Balfour Golf Club.The tour championship was originally scheduled to be 36 holes, but was shortened to 27 holes.  McKay opened the day with a first round two under par score of 70, three shots better than Braden McKay’s 73 and nine better than Moroney.  Only Moroney and Braden McKay had a mathematical chance to catch Tyler McKay for Player of The Year. last_img read more

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Hawks, Leafs headed for Murdoch Division showdown; Bruins fall out of playoff race

first_imgIt appears the Beaver Valley Nitehawks and Nelson Leafs are heading for a showdown to decide the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League’s Murdoch Division regular season title.Both teams took care of business during the weekend setting up the final regular season game February 22 in Fruitvale as the deciding game.Nelson swept the Grand Forks Border Bruins in a weekend series, Saturday’s 6-5 win in the Boundary City as the clincher.The Leafs opened with a 6-4 win Friday at home.For the Hawks, the two-headed monster of Ryan Edwards and Dallas Calvin led Beaver Valley to 6-3 and 8-3 victories over the Castlegar Rebels.Beaver Valley continues to trail the Leafs by two points in the Murdoch standings. However, the Hawks have two games remaining in the season to Nelson’s one.The Hawks travel to Spokane Friday before hosting Nelson Saturday at home.Leafs tame struggling BruinsFor the second straight game Nelson jumped all over the Bruins before coasting the road win in Grand Forks Saturday.Linden Horsill, Aaron Dunlap and Alex Wilkinson scored in the opening frame to give Nelson a 3-1 advantage after 20 minutes.Nelson out shot the Bruins 22-6 in the period.Tucker Brown scored the lone goal for the Grand Forks.Carsen Willans, Travis Wellman and Connor Tetlock scored in the middle frame to give Nelson a 6-3 lead.Jackson Purvis and Connor Gross replied for the Bruins.In the third the Bruins pushed the Leafs, but could only muster goals by Nelson Minor Hockey product Coleton Dawson and Brown, with his second of the game.“We had a successful weekend,” said Leaf coach Frank Maida. “We went into the weekend with a goal of getting four points and we achieved our goal.” Adam Maida kicked faced 36 shots in the Nelson nets to out duel Dominic Stadnyk for the win.Nelson was missing KIJHL leading scorer Jamie Vlanich for the game. The Leaf sniper was handed a match penalty for kicking during a fight with Dakota Kittle in the third period of Friday’s win.Vlanich, who took a couple of big hits in the game, including a knee-on-knee exchange at center ice from former Leaf Connor Gross, is awaiting word on if there will be a suspension or even if a match penalty should have been called on the play as the video tape of the game shows no skate actions.Leaf management is awaiting a final decision from KIJHL governors and BC Hockey.The loss for Grand Forks saw a playoff run end almost as quickly as it started for the Boundary franchise.Grand Forks has lost six straight games and nine out of its last 11 games.Hawks Edwards too much for Rebels to handleRyan Edwards busted out of a passive goal scoring slump with a four-goal outburst to lead Beaver Valley past Castlegar 8-3.The Hawks put the game away early by scoring four times in the opening frame, two going to Braden Fuller and Edwards and Dallas Calvin adding singles.The teams exchanged second period goals before Beaver Valley out scored the Rebels 3-2 in the final frame.Aaron Brewer, Darren Medeiros and Sam Swanson replied for Castlegar.Friday, Calvin scored three times to pace the Hawks to a 6-3 win.Edwards had a goal and two assists while Riley Brandt and Jeremy Lucchini also scored for the Hawks.Edwards is currently riding a five game scoring streak, with 15 points and seven goals.Braves get hot at right timeSpokane Braves could leapfrog over Castlegar in the race for third in the Murdoch Division.The Braves meet Grand Forks in the Boundary City Sunday.Castlegar, with only one game remaining in the season, holds a one-point lead over the Braves.last_img read more

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