Deschamps denies Laportes France snub is personal

first_imgFrance coach Didier Deschamps insists he cannot have two left-footed defenders at centre-back in his team following Aymeric Laporte’s shocking claimsSince arriving from Athletic Bilbao in last January for a club record fee of £57m at Manchester City, Laporte has become regarded as one of the best defenders in Europe.But the 24-year-old surprisingly continues to be overlooked by Deschamps for France with the likes of Kurt Zouma and Mamadou Sakho getting the nod instead.This led the uncapped Laporte to make a stunning accusation against Deschamps by claiming it’s personal last week.But the former Juventus boss insists his decision was based purely on footballing reasons.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…“I do not understand [why Laporte made those statements]. I do not know,” Deschamps told RMC Sport.“I do not have a problem with anyone. When I choose someone it is not for me. I repeat. I only have one thing to say to him and that is that he continues to perform well.“If you tell me he must be in [Marseille centre-back Adil] Rami’s place then I stop you right away.“Sorry but two left-footed defenders at centre-back at international level… We have a lot of left-footers and few right-footers.”Laporte, who’s played every single one of City’s Premier League games this season, will likely start in today’s clash against Crystal Palace.last_img read more

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Snow Crash author Neal Stephenson Were in the dystopia right now

first_img 0 Part of Fall, or Dodge in Hell feels like a nightmare critique of current life: a meme-destroyed America can no longer tell truth from fiction, and augmented reality glasses make reality bend even further. To battle the overbearing flow of information, everyone has personal editors that curate their feeds… which leads to more reality bubbles. Stephenson admits that our current reality has gotten stranger and darker than most science fiction: “People talk about dystopian fiction and dystopian writers. But we’re in the dystopia right now, because of what social media is doing to our civic institutions and our society.” But Fall goes further, spinning past that. A good half of the book takes place in a digital afterlife patterned on Forthrast’s fantasy online game worlds, and starts to become a sprawling fantasy novel. Biblical overtones abound, with angels, Adam and Eve, and a storyline that Stephenson says is inspired by Paradise Lost.  It’s not easy sailing. The book’s level of detail is often daunting. Some sections seem to last forever. I found myself glued to it all, though. And, weeks after I finished reading, the ideas are burning in my brain. Some chapters have ideas that could seed full novels of their own. 05-neal-stephenson-book-cnet-interviewThe inside cover of Fall, or Dodge in Hell, with a mysterious map. Sarah Tew/CNET The book has maps, by the way, a tip of the hat to sprawling epics like Lord of the Rings. “I’ve always loved fantasy and science fiction books with maps in them: you know, ever since Lord of the Rings, and Dune, and so on,” says Stephenson. “I’ve always wanted to do one of those. And the new twist, in this case, is that instead of the landscape being a fixed thing that’s always been there, it…kind of gets built out over time into a fully realized world.” While a digital version is far more portable, seeing the occasional maps pop up in the book (there’s a reason for them) makes the physical version worth it. And by the way, if you’re a frequent Stephenson reader, this book shares many familiar characters as other books: the Shaftoes and the Waterhouses of the Baroque Cycle and Cryptonomicon, and the ever-enigmatic character Enoch Root. Fall shares the same universe with those books and Reamde, but Stephenson says that this might be the end of that: “I mean, never say never. But right now, I would say it’s a cycle that I have written. I think we’ve kind of wound that up with this latest book.” Subscribe: CNET RSS | iTunes | FeedBurner | Google Play | TuneIn | Stitcher  See Fall, or Dodge in Hell at AmazonAbout CNET Book ClubThe Book Club is hosted by a pair of self-proclaimed book experts: Dan Ackerman (author of the nonfiction video game history book The Tetris Effect), and Scott Stein, a playwright and screenwriter. We’ll be announcing our next Book Club selection soon, so send us your suggestions and keep an eye out for updates on Twitter at @danackerman and @jetscott. Previous episodes Borne by Jeff VanderMeerWalkaway by Cory DoctorowArtemis by Andy WeirDown the River Unto the Sea by Walter MosleyTen Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now by Jaron LanierCNET Book Club: Holiday 2018 gift guide specialTeam Human by Douglas RushkoffJosh Frank on bringing the Marx Brothers and Salvador Dalí togetherTim Maughan asks, what if the internet dies? Blake Crouch messes with your memories in Recursion Subscribe to CNET Book Club: CNET RSS | iTunes | FeedBurner | Google Play | TuneIn | Stitcher Neal Stephenson’s latest book is intimidating. Sarah Tew/CNET If you’re looking for a long, dense, wild read this summer, here’s one that’s 880-plus pages. The weirdly named Fall, or Dodge in Hell is just waiting for you to arrive. Subscribe: CNET RSS | iTunes | FeedBurner | Google Play | TuneIn | Stitcher   Neal Stephenson, whose 1992 book Snow Crash defined virtual worlds and the “metaverse” as much as William Gibson’s Neuromancer did cyberspace, has written a number of amazing and challenging books: The Diamond Age, Cryptonomicon, Anathem, Seveneves. His latest book shares the same characters as Reamde, a 2011 book about online game worlds, gold farming and terror cells. But Fall also stands on its own. Richard Forthrast, a legendary game designer, dies and ends up having his brain scanned and uploaded. His consciousness lives on in a virtual afterlife. Meanwhile, the real world keeps going on…and getting increasingly strange. Stephenson is the master of long-scale science fiction: his book Anathem explored civilizations spanning eons, Seveneves starts in the present, and follows the survivors of the destruction of Earth over thousands of years. Fall, or Dodge in Hell starts about now, and moves forward about a hundred years… or more. I won’t spoil the rest. “It’s not a conscious thing,” Stephenson says about his recent trend toward time-spanning books. “I think it’s true of a lot of fantasy and science fiction that it’s all about world building. And a lot of the time, in many cases, those worlds span long periods of time.” We’re in the dystopia right now, because of what social media is doing to our civic institutions and our society. Neal Stephenson   Tags CNET Book Clubcenter_img Share your voice Post a comment Culturelast_img read more

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Somebody out there wants to hurt us Arson in Boston Chicago rattles

first_imgAysha Khan ayshabkhan Survey: 1 in 3 Protestants think more stories of abuse by pastors yet to come By: Aysha Khan ayshabkhan Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! Share This! Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,BOSTON (RNS) — A rash of fires that police say were intentionally set at Jewish community centers in Chicago and around Boston last week has left Jewish groups feeling vulnerable.At the Chabad Center for Jewish Life in Arlington, Mass., where Rabbi Avi Bukiet and his family live about 20 minutes outside of Boston, firefighters were called to put out a shingle fire May 11.Then they were called there again for another fire May 16.Then, about an hour later that day, firefighters responded to a nearby fire at the Chabad Jewish Center in Needham, where Rabbi Mendy Krinsky lives with his family about 30 minutes outside of Boston.Authorities say all three Boston-area fires were deliberately set and are being investigated as potential hate crimes.RELATED: For houses of worship, interfaith collaboration is the future of security Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 By: Aysha Khan ayshabkhan Share This! News “Somebody out there wants to hurt us,” wrote Krinsky’s wife, Chanie Krinsky, who co-directs the Needham Chabad, on Facebook after the fire. “Just because we exist. And that is frightening. Hate can’t be reasoned with. Hate just needs to be eradicated. A little bit of light dispels a lot of darkness. Please take this opportunity to help us end this darkness. Do a mitzvah today to bring more light into this world!”No one was injured, and law enforcement officials said they have not determined whether the fires in the two Boston-area towns are connected. Nor have they said whether the incidents were linked to a fire that damaged the Diyanet Mosque in New Haven, Conn., the same week, which police also say was intentionally set.“People are scared but are refusing to be intimidated in any manner,” said the Anti-Defamation League’s New England regional director, Robert Trestan. “An attack on one synagogue is an attack on the entire Jewish community. It’s not just one building.”An attack on a rabbi’s home is particularly alarming, he said.“People lived there,” Trestan said. “It’s not like a synagogue, where it’s closed at night and no one’s there. It’s a reminder that people don’t just pray in a large, established building. And when you try to start a fire at an institution like this, you’re also trying to burn someone’s house down.”Days later, in Chicago, police found Molotov cocktails outside a synagogue and an adjacent Jewish community center over the weekend. Authorities say two attempts were made Saturday night to ignite the Anshe Sholom B’nai Israel Congregation and that windows of cars parked outside the synagogue and another nearby synagogue were smashed.Chicago police released a photo of a man they are trying to identify in relation to the attempted arson on May 19, 2019, at Anshe Sholom B’nai Israel Congregation in Chicago. Photo courtesy of Chicago Police Department“The willful effort to attack a house of worship, to try to burn it down, is a chilling reminder, at a time of rising anti-Semitism in the United States, of the vulnerability of synagogues and other Jewish institutions,” said Laurence Bolotin, director of the American Jewish Committee’s Chicago branch.“While thankfully the attacks did not cause any injuries or damage, this incident is yet another disturbing reminder of the recent escalation in attacks against Jews and Jewish institutions,” David Goldenberg, Midwest regional director for the Anti-Defamation League, said in a statement.Goldenberg pointed to the Boston fires and recent shootings at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh and the Chabad of Poway near San Diego, which left a combined 12 worshippers dead.In Massachusetts, the ADL, the local chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations and the state fire marshal have offered a combined $21,000 reward for tips leading to the arsonist’s conviction.“This is something which has not just shook (my wife) Luna and myself to the core, but it has shocked the entire community, and they’re sharing that with us,” Avi Bukiet said in a news conference Friday (May 17). “What has gone on … it has targeted not just a Jewish center, it has targeted our personal family and we are hurting because of this.”But Boston’s Jewish community leaders emphasized that the attacks have not broken their community’s spirits and that the chabads’ doors will remain open to all.“We have committed our lives to spreading the universal message of light and love,” Luna Bukiet said. “This will not deter us. If anything, we will double down to bring more goodness into the world and create a better world for all of our children.”Two weeks ago, the Chabad Jewish Center in Needham held a Shabbat service in response to the shooting at the Chabad of Poway. “Our response to cold-blooded, baseless, relentless hatred must be pure, unconditional love and acts of kindness,” the center posted on Facebook. “Today more than ever we must respond to darkness with unyielding light. He brought death to Shul. Let us bring life to Shul!”Earlier this month, video footage also surfaced showing two separate incidents in which Hasidic Jews in Brooklyn were being assaulted and harassed on the streets. Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email News • Photos of the Week By: Aysha Khan ayshabkhan Catholicism Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Share This! Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Wilton Gregory installed as new Catholic archbishop of Washington Tagsanti-Semitism Boston Chabad Chabad of Poway Chicago homepage featured synagogue attack,You may also like Aysha Khan Aysha Khan is a Boston-based journalist reporting on American Muslims and millennial faith for RNS. Her newsletter, Creeping Sharia, curates news coverage of Muslim communities in the U.S. Previously, she was the social media editor at RNS.,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Photos of the Week August 30, 2019last_img read more

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